Fight Food Allergies this Party Season

It’s the most wonderful time of the year! The office is full of fun holiday food, the party invitations are flowing in, and sweet temptations seem to be found around every corner. For most people, the holiday season offers up opportunities to indulge a little and try some new foods and desserts. However, navigating this time of year can be tricky for adults and children with food allergies.

Balance Disorders Explained

Feeling dizzy or momentarily losing your balance is something that most people have experienced at some point in time. Those who have can recall the sensation of falling or lacking control and stability. Imagine, then, what it must feel like to suffer from a balance disorder on a semi-regular or regular basis. Symptoms of a balance disorder include: dizziness, vertigo, staggering while walking, lightheadedness, faintness, a floating sensation, blurred vision, confusion, and disorientation. There are many different types of balance disorders, below we explain some of the most common:

Steer Clear of Food Allergens this Halloween

Approximately one in every thirteen children is currently living with some type of food allergy. Managing a food allergy can be quite frustrating for a child and his or her caregivers, especially during holidays. With Halloween around the corner, kids have more exposure than normal to foods and candy that can trigger an allergic reaction. Milk, eggs, peanuts, and tree nuts are the most common allergens for kids, and peanuts and tree nuts cause the most severe reactions. Unfortunately, these ingredients are often found in the sweets that are handed out during trick or treating. Follow the below tips for receiving and handing out candy this Halloween.

Keep Your Home Allergy Free this Fall

With fall on the horizon, most New Englanders are anticipating cooler weather, football season, and foliage. However, seasonal allergy sufferers may be less than enthusiastic about the coming change in seasons and temperature. Fall allergens, such as ragweed, mold spores, and dust, affect approximately thirty-five million Americans and can persist until the first frost. In addition to taking allergy medication and consulting a doctor, there are ways to protect your home against these allergens in an attempt to make it more comfortable during the fall season.

Symptoms of a Deviated Septum

The thin wall, or nasal septum, between your nasal passages is primarily made up of bone and cartilage. A deviated septum occurs when the nasal septum is crooked or off center and causes one nasal passage to be significantly smaller than the other. Often times, people are born with a deviated symptom but, in some cases, it can be developed after an injury to the nose. This condition can make breathing difficult and cause many other symptoms. Read on to find out more:

Grass Allergy

Summer is in full effect here in New England, but for those suffering from a grass allergy, the summer might be more troublesome than fun. Wind can carry grass pollen for miles and even a small amount can cause a reaction. A grass allergy is typically worse on dry and sunny days.

Tonsils and Tonsillectomies

visit the beach, go to camp, or head out on a family vacation. However, for children dealing with enlarged tonsils or bouts of tonsillitis, the summer might be the time of year to be thinking about a tonsillectomy because recovery can take up to ten to fourteen days.

Protect Yourself Against Bee Stings

Those that have an allergy to bee stings may not feel as prepared to protect themselves as the warm weather arrives. For most people, a bee sting causes some redness and/or swelling and just a few hours of pain. Those with an allergy to bee stings can experience much more intense and, sometimes, life-threatening symptoms.

Plymouth Ear, Nose and Throat Offers Earlens to Patients

Plymouth Ear, Nose and Throat is excited to now be providing Earlens hearing devices to our patients! Earlens is the “world’s first light-driven hearing technology” and produces sounds that are more rich and natural sounding than those produced by conventional hearing aids. As a result, Earlens wearers have an easier time understanding people in noisy environments and are more comfortable in group situations.

Causes of Chronic Snoring

Do you snore? It’s quite possible! In fact, about forty-five percent of people do snore on occasion and aren’t particularly bothered by it. An additional twenty-five percent of people suffer from chronic snoring. Snoring is bothersome, can cause embarrassment, and may also lead to serious and long-term health problems.

The 8 Most Common Food Allergies

Did you know that nearly fifteen million American adults and children suffer from some type of food allergy? Food allergy symptoms can range from mild to moderate to severe and include vomiting, cramping, hives, swelling, trouble swallowing, and anaphylaxis. And, even though all foods can potentially cause an allergic reaction, there are eight foods that most commonly do so.

Wintertime Sinuses

Most people connect sinus inflammation and infections with the spring and summer months when seasonal allergies are at their worst. However, sufferers will tell you that their sinus symptoms, such as headaches, runny noses, coughing, congestion, sinus pressure, congestion, and post nasal drip, often intensify during the winter. Here’s why:

Fight Holiday Allergies

Some people may assume that they won’t have to contend with allergies once the fall has left us. But, with the holiday season upon us, it is possible that your allergies and asthma may return with a vengeance. Sneezing and congestion may arrive around this time and can put quite a damper on your holiday cheer!

Get the Details on Dysphagia

Dysphagia, or more commonly referred to as a swallowing disorder, can afflict people of all ages but is generally more prevalent in the elderly. Those with dysphagia often have trouble swallowing food or liquid and passing it from the mouth to the stomach. Although this feeling may cause a bit of anxiety or nervousness, it is rarely an indicator of something more serious. Dysphagia may clear up on its own but, when it does not, one should consult an otolaryngologist.

How to Manage Your Food Allergy

Approximately fifteen million Americans, including one in every 13 children, are living with some type of food allergy. Food allergies can be life-threatening and should not be taken lightly. This has become more apparent in recent years and, if you have school-aged children, you’ve likely been warned more than once not to send peanut products or special birthday treats into school. The most common food allergens are milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish.

Is Your Child Suffering from Chronic Ear Infections?

Did you know that we here at Plymouth Ear, Nose and Throat have over thirty years of experience dealing with pediatric otolaryngology problems? Ear infections that have become recurrent, or even chronic, is one of those pediatric issues that we tackle on a regular basis. Although some may be more prone to ear infections than others, it is important to be educated about the facts of ear infections, what causes them, and what can be done to help ease and avoid them. 

Six Ways to Ward off Fall Allergies

Fall is quickly approaching and with the changing of seasons comes an increase in ragweed. Ragweed plants release millions of grains of pollen making it a major culprit in seasonal allergies. Its growth peaks in mid-September so now is the time to start planning your attack against those pesky allergy symptoms.

Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Explained

More than 60 million American adults suffer from heartburn at least once a month. The more long-lasting and and serious form is referred to as GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is similar to gastroesophageal reflux disease but those suffering from LPR often do not experience heartburn. Therefore, LPR is often referred to as silent reflux.

Lyme Disease Awareness

In the Northeastern United States, deer ticks are carriers of the Lyme disease bacteria and can pass the disease onto adults or children by biting. The good news, though, is that it takes a day or two after a tick attaches to the skin before Lyme disease will spread. Therefore, it is super important to do regular skin check on anybody in your household during the aforementioned months, especially if you spend a lot of time outdoors or have animals that go outside.